Cheryl Fleming - RE/MAX Executive Realty


Unfortunately, selling a house sometimes can be a long, complicated process. And if you're not careful, you risk costly, time-consuming mistakes that may prevent you from achieving your home selling goals.

When it comes to selling a house, it helps to plan ahead as much as possible. Lucky for you, we're here to teach you about the home selling journey and ensure you can enjoy a fast, seamless home selling experience.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to simplify the home selling process.

1. Boost Your House's Curb Appeal

The first impression that your home makes on potential buyers can have far-flung effects on the home selling journey. If your house dazzles homebuyers, you may increase the likelihood of a quick, profitable home selling experience. On the other hand, if your home misses the mark with buyers, you may struggle to stir up interest in your house.

Perform home exterior upgrades to enhance your house's appearance. Mow the lawn, trim the hedges and clear debris from any walkways. Also, repair any cracked or damaged siding to further bolster your house's appearance and ensure homebuyers will fall in love with your house as soon as they see it.

2. Eliminate Clutter

Clutter may dominate your home's interior, and if you don't clear it out, you risk missing out on opportunities to sell your house.

Fortunately, there are many ways to eliminate clutter. For example, a yard sale is a quick, effective way to sell assorted items before you list your residence. Or, you can list items online or donate them to charity.

If there are various items you want to keep, you may want to rent a storage unit. With a storage unit at your disposal, you can keep a wide range of items safe and outside your home until your residence sells.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a housing market expert who is committed to helping home sellers achieve the optimal results. He or she will work with you throughout the home selling journey and ensure you can enjoy a successful home selling experience.

Usually, a real estate agent will meet with you, learn about your home and craft a personalized home selling strategy. This housing market professional then will promote your residence to buyers and host open house events and home showings. Furthermore, if a homebuyer makes an offer to purchase your house, a real estate agent will help you review this proposal and determine whether to accept, reject or counter it.

A real estate agent also will respond to your home selling concerns or questions. Thus, if you are uncertain about how to navigate the home selling journey, a real estate agent is ready to offer guidance.

There is no need to stress as you get ready to list your residence. Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you can eliminate the guesswork commonly associated with selling a house.


Before you make the final decision to buy any property, one of the most important things you can for yourself is to ask for a home inspection with a good home inspector. You probably don’t know how to ascertain the quality of the foundation or the condition the electrical wiring is, so having a home inspector conduct a visit will help you identify things that you should watch out for as well as things to note before you finally purchase the home.

  • Carry out your own inspection beforehand. It's always better that you have had time to check out the house yourself before going to hire a home inspector. You get to check out the wiring, plumbing, roofing, etc. and see if anything looks out of place to you. You can now raise those questions whenever the home inspector carries out his visit.
  • Be present for the home inspection. Attending the inspection is so you can be available to ask questions about things that bother you. You want to be sure that nothing is left unexplained to you, so the best way to tap into the relevant knowledge your home inspector has is actually to show up for the inspection.
  • Look out for quick fixes. Sometimes a quick fix like a fresh paint job in one room or new wall in just one part of the house may mean that the seller is mindful of you and pays attention or very motivated to sell the home. Other times, it may be that the seller is trying to hide something and cover it up from you. Whatever the case may be, you won't get another look at those fixes.
  • Take a lot of pictures. Always ask the home inspector to take pictures of the home or bring your camera along yourself. You might not get an opportunity to go back to the house to have a second view at something you just remembered so it’s often preferable to have lots of pictures that you can always go back to see whenever something new comes to mind.
  • Hire someone you can trust. You don't want to use a home inspector without any loyalty to you. You should focus on finding a person that can talk freely to you about any potential issues. If you need help finding a reliable home inspector, you should ask at your local neighborhood association or real estate professional for recommendations.

It's moving day. With all paper's signed and keys in hand, movers unload furniture and boxes into your new digs. But nothing seems to fit. Move just one thing, and everything is out of place. Your old furniture seems bulky—or dwarfed. 

It’s Just. Not. Right. Busting the budget to buy new furniture is out of the question, so what do you do?

Clear the slate

If the weather allows, or your garage is available, move everything out of the room. Once the floor is empty, draw out a rough floor plan with a half-inch to one-foot scale or use an online floorplan option—many online furniture retailers offer floorplan tools on their websites. Measure every wall, window, and doorway, twice!

Cut rectangles or circles the to represent furniture. Use the exact same scale you used for the floor plan. If you're using an online tool, choose sample furniture as close to the size and shape of yours available. Then, arrange and rearrange the most important or largest pieces until they fit.

Try unusual options

If the sofa always sits against the wall under the windows, try moving it into the room so that the back creates a walkway. Place loveseats opposite rather than at right angles to the sofa and place a coffee table between them. When the predominant piece is the entertainment center, consider if it fits at an angle. Group furniture for watching television separately from a conversation area or study area. Anchoring larger pieces on an area rug rather than against a wall gives a room depth and dimension.

Wait to hang art

Once you've placed the larger pieces. Live with them in place for a few days before you add wall art and décor. Lean larger artwork against first one wall and then another to see how light plays off the surface. Change up how you've always done it. Perhaps a painting that formerly hung in your family room could go in a bedroom instead. Group smaller framed art together to create dramatic visual appeal.

Move smaller pieces around

After a few days with decorative tables, bookcases, or lamps in one location, try moving them to a new position to see if it works better. If something feels congested or cramped, move it—or remove it. Conversely, when your new space feels empty, consider what might fill that gap. Avoid adding furniture just to take up space. You might find a stack of floor pillows, or a minor adjustment in location works better.

Buy to fit

When you’re sure of the spaces left over, save up to buy just the thing that both fits your area and provides you joy. After all, you'll be in your new home for several years, so you have plenty of time to fill the space with items you love. 

If you’re completely frustrated with making your furniture fit, consider hiring a professional decorator or organizer. With a fresh eye, what you already have might just be all you need.


If you're getting ready to put your house on the market, your mind is probably flooded with dozens of unanswerable questions. Much of your uncertainty may revolve around the marketability of your home and how quickly a qualified buyer will come along.

Although there are factors over which you have little control, there are several things you can do to tip the scales in your direction.

Other than sprucing up your home and yard to maximize their visual appeal, choosing a top-notch real estate agent is the single most important step you can take. It's not only crucial to select an agent who is both experienced and proactive, but you'll also want to find a professional with whom you have a good rapport. You can usually get a pretty good idea of their experience and sales history from online profiles, but the only way to know whether they're a good fit for your needs and personality is by meeting with them face to face.

If you have the time and inclination, it can also be to your advantage to interview more than one candidate. The agent you ultimately choose will have a direct bearing on virtually all aspects of the sales process. By choosing a professional who is dedicated, knowledgeable, and easy to work with, you'll be taking a big step toward getting your house sold within the shortest period of time. A good agent will keep you motivated, informed, and focused on keeping your home in marketable condition. They'll also help you with everything from pricing and negotiating to problem solving and setting up appointments.

There are several other things you can do to increase the chances of attracting potential buyers and offers. Creating as much curb appeal as possible can go a long way toward making a great first impression. The concept of curb appeal can encompass many different elements, but the battle is half won when your lawn, bushes, and trees are kept neatly trimmed at all times. Weather permitting, displaying colorful potted flowers and hanging baskets is another way to add a lot of eye appeal to your home. Simple improvements like painting your front steps, sealcoating your driveway, or touching up the paint on window shutters or porch railings can also help enhance your home's curb appeal.

Although interior painting can be time-consuming and a bit messy, it's often one of the most cost-effective ways to make a positive impression on potential buyers. If your walls are looking scuffed, faded, or otherwise neglected, a fresh coat of neutral, beige, or grey paint can often make a huge difference in the eye-appeal of your home. Making sure your carpets are clean, counter tops are immaculate, and your windows are crystal clear are other ways to put your best foot forward when house hunters are scheduled to visit your home.


If this is your first time buying a home, you might be worried that you aren’t asking enough questions. Or maybe you’re concerned you’re not asking the right questions--the things that matter the most when making a financial decision as important and life-changing as buying a home.  

While everyone’s situation is unique when buying a home, there are some questions that all buyers could benefit from asking. These questions will help you learn more about the home, how competitive the house is, and how much work you’ll need to put into it.

Since time is usually of the essence for people buying a home, it makes sense to ask questions early on so that you don’t waste too much time exploring an option that isn’t ideal for your situation.

In this article, we’re going to give you 5 important questions to ask when you talk to a seller and their agent so that you can be prepared to make the best decision for you or your family.

1. How flexible is the asking price?

While few sellers or agents will outright tell you if they’d accept a lower offer, it’s still a good idea to ask this question, as it will open up a conversation about the seller’s feelings toward the home and whether they’re pricing high with the hopes of receiving slightly lower offers.

2. How many offers has the home received?

It may seem counterintuitive, but most agents and sellers will be quite happy to tell you if they’ve received other offers. They know that once you know the current offer you’ll have to either come up with a higher offer or move on. It’s a win-win for you and the seller, as it equips both of you with information you need to make the best choice.

3. Why are the sellers moving away?

This question can be personal, so if you receive an answer that suggests it’s a family matter, don’t press for too many details. However, some sellers and agents will let you know exactly why the house is for sale. From this simple question, you can learn the seller’s timeline for making the sale, details about the schools or neighborhoods, and any other reason that might drive someone to move out of the neighborhood.

4. Are there any problems with the house that you know of?

Although you’ll have an inspection contingency in your contract if you do decide to make an offer on the home, it’s better to know if there are any issues with the home before going through the bidding process.

Most sellers understand this and will be upfront about any problems with the home, including repairs that need to be made now or will need to be made soon after you move in.

5. What is the average cost of utilities?

Buying a home comes with a lot of added costs and fees. However, many people forget about the changes in the cost of utilities that comes with buying a home--especially if you’re moving from an apartment where some utilities may have been included.

The seller will be able to give you a good estimate on the cost of electricity, garbage removal, internet, heat, and more.




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